A Travellerspoint blog

Easter Vacation in 1969 The First Two Days

Visiting Museums and Towns Around Philadelphia


View Bermuda & 1964 Ship Follower & Florida in the late 60s & Two Colonial Cities & Transcontinental Drive Across the US in 1966 & Twice across the U.S. in 1964 in a 1932 Plymouth and 1964 Ford on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Spring Vacation we went on a 5 day touring spree.

I tried to pick interactive things with buttons to push, demonstrations to see, and things to do.

Day 1

We drove west to Ephrata Chloisters
Children running toward the entrance

Children running toward the entrance


Ephrata was the community of the German Seventh Day Baptist's founded by Conrad Beissel . He believed earthly life should be spent preparing to achieve a spiritual union with God at the Second Coming he felt would be soon.
Bob in front of the Sisters House

Bob in front of the Sisters House


By the early 1750s, nearly 80 celibate Brothers and Sisters were housed in Germanic log, stone, and half-timbered buildings which were originally erected between 1735 and 1749. Although the Cloisters often practiced their religion by interpreting Biblical works, they also did practical things like carpentry and papermaking, plus the daily life jobs of gardening, preparing meals, and sewing. They manufactured clothing on a mill

The Ephrata Cloister had the second German printing press in the American coloniesl They printed hymns on this press.

Cellar door and Sister's house with Dormers in the roof

Cellar door and Sister's house with Dormers in the roof


Saron, the Sisters’ House, was constructed in 1743 for Householder couples who left their homes to live as celibate Brothers and Sisters. It was a brief experiment and when the husbands and wives returned to their farms, the building was remodeled to accommodate the Sisterhood who called themselves the Roses of Sharon. Each of the building’s three main floors contained a kitchen, a room for eating, two common workrooms, and about 12 sleeping chambers, one chamber for each sister. For nearly 15 years Mother Maria Eicher directed the Sisters’ daily duties and maintained their independence from the Brotherhood. After the death of the last Sister in 1813, the building was divided into apartments and rented to church members

postcard of Ephrata

postcard of Ephrata

Next to the Sister's House is The Saal, the Meetinghouse, which is a Fachwerk or half-timbered building constructed in 1741 as a worship hall for Householders. When the Sisterhood moved into the adjoining building, they took control of this Meetinghouse. Here, Sisters worshiped each midnight while the Brothers gathered in their own Saal. The entire congregation used the Meetinghouse on Mount Zion for Saturday worship. The services in each of the Meetinghouses included scripture reading, lessons, and music. Special fellowship gatherings, called Love Feasts, celebrated the coming of Christ with feet washing, a meal, and the Eucharist with bread and wine

Stone building which may be the kitchen

Stone building which may be the kitchen

As the Solitary population shrank in the 1770s, the Householders took a more active part in daily work. They probably added the stone kitchen to the rear of the building as a place to prepare their Love Feast meals.

Bed and window

Bed and window


Members were required to sleep on wooden benches 15 inches wide, with wooden blocks for pillows. They slept six hours per night, from 9 P.M. to midnight, and from 2 A.M. until 5 A.M., with a two-hour break to "watch" for the coming of Christ.

Guide letting us out the door

Guide letting us out the door

Guide ahead of us

Guide ahead of us


The guide is taking us to the Academy which was opened by the Householders in 1837 as a private school for their children and others from the area. The tradition of teaching school at Ephrata dates back to the mid-1700s when Brother Obed (Ludwig Höcker) conducted lessons for neighborhood children. Most of the teaching focused on reading, writing, and arithmetic. At first, the Academy was a subscription school where students paid for each subject they studied to support the teacher’s salary. In the early 1840s, the enterprising teacher, Joseph Wiggins, also offered chemistry, measuring, surveying, and astronomy.
Bob pushing the stroller

Bob pushing the stroller

There are two possibilities to tour Ephrata - you can do a self guided tour on your own, or you can do a tour with a guide which includes a tour of the two most significant original buildings, the Sisters’ House and the Meetinghouse. (The interior of these two buildings are only accessible on guided tours.) We apparently did the guided tour.
Parking lot and Country Store

Parking lot and Country Store

Bob carrying E

Bob carrying E

After we left Ephrata we drove to the Amish/Menonite area of Lancaster.
The sign out front says Antiques

The sign out front says Antiques


We went to the farmer's market in Lancaster but I didn't take any photos of it until much later.
Central Market from the back in 2016

Central Market from the back in 2016


Amish family carriage (closed)

Amish family carriage (closed)


We had lunch and then drove through Bird in Hand and Soudersberg back home.
Gulf gas station and Zimmerman's store

Gulf gas station and Zimmerman's store

Photo of open Amish carriage

Photo of open Amish carriage


I I spent most of the time taking photos of the Amish carriages in stealth mode from the car. The Amish don't believe in photography (graven images)
Wagons in a shed

Wagons in a shed


Amish carriage

Amish carriage

Day 2

The second day we went northwest to Hopewell Furnace in Elverson in the morning. Operating from 1771-1883, Hopewell Furnace was part of the industrialization of the colonies. That was part of the reason that we won the Revolutionary War. The King and Parliment made laws forbidding the construction of iron furnaces, which the colonists did not obey.

But the reason we went was to give the chlidren a day out in history.

5422-.jpgLooking down from the house

Looking down from the house


We saw the
Anthracite furnace

Anthracite furnace


Which was a failed attempt at hot blast technology

large_5426-.jpg

The first part of the Hopewell process was making charcoal, but I don't have any pictures of that. The furnace needed an acre of hardwoods a day. The wood was turned into charcoal. That's why Hopewell had to be out in the country, and it also meant that it was a fairly self contained community. After the charcoal was made and cooled, fillers carted charcoal, limestone, and iron ore via the connecting shed to the

Bridge house

Bridge house

At the base of the furnace the water wheel which drove the blast machinery
Waterwheel

Waterwheel


In the cast house surrounding the furnace stack, moulders cast iron into stove plates and other products.
5421-.jpgBeams inside the Cast House

Beams inside the Cast House


Looking down on the Cast House

Looking down on the Cast House

Hopewell Cast House from inside stable window

Hopewell Cast House from inside stable window

Apporaching the office

Apporaching the office


Office

Office


Tenant houses (right) for families and boarding house (left) for single men

Tenant houses (right) for families and boarding house (left) for single men


Ironmaster's house from below

Ironmaster's house from below


The Ironmaster's house was not only for the furnace owner's family, but it was also the central office for the furnace, and a boarding house for single workers. The house has 19 rooms on four floors. The oldest part of the house dates to circa 1800. Additions built in the 19th century resulted in the house you see today. The basement contains a kitchen and dining room for the use by the furnace's iron workers. The furnace's main office, family parlor, kitchen and dining room were on the first floor. The family and guest bedrooms were on the second. The family's children, servants and boarders likely lived in different parts of the attic and rear wing.
Inside the house

Inside the house

Ironmaster's mansion

Ironmaster's mansion

Map of Hopewell with legend

Map of Hopewell with legend

We continued north to Reading.
1969 Carseat in the VW

1969 Carseat in the VW

We climbed up to the Reading Pagoda
Girls standing between a pagoda shaped phone booth and a sign about Duryea Drive

Girls standing between a pagoda shaped phone booth and a sign about Duryea Drive

The Reading Pagoda was built in 1908. A symbol of the city for more than a Century,
from inside the Pagoda

from inside the Pagoda


the Pagoda is anchored to the mountainside atop the south end of Mount Penn.
5431-90599_00.jpgView from the Pagoda

View from the Pagoda

On the way, to Bethlehem we stopped at Roadside America.
Roadside America

Roadside America


This is a large miniature village representing small-town America. The late Laurence T. Gieringer spent his entire life making the town -- as a small boy, he thought that a building several miles away was really small enough for him to pick up -- a toy rather than a regular building which seemed small because of distance.
Roadside America

Roadside America


Roadside America is laid out in one big 6,000 square foot room, with perimeter walkways. It is actually a whole series of villages showing life from pioneer times to the 60s when Mr. Gieringer died. There are lots of buttons to push to get mechanical things to work, trains to move, or lights to blink. But is very dark in there for photographs

At the end of the day, we went to Bethlehem. On April 2, 1741, William Allen, a wealthy Philadelphia merchant, who later founded the city of Allentown, deeded 500 acres along the banks of the Monocacy Creek and Lehigh River to the Moravian Church. On Christmas Eve of that year David Nitschmann and Nicolaus Zinzendorf, leading a small group of Moravians, founded the mission community of Bethlehem at the confluence of the Monocacy and Lehigh rivers.

They set up missionary communities among the Native Americans and unchurched German-speaking Christians. They named the settlement after the Biblical town Bethlehem of Judea. Bethlehem was started as a typical Moravian Settlement Congregation, where the Church owned all the property. Until the 1850s, officially only members of the Moravian Church were permitted to lease land plots in Bethlehem. But there was also a group of families who were Huguenots and settled in Bethlehem. In the late 1700s,

We drove by the Moravian Cemetery and the church which is now a museum
Moravian Cemetery

Moravian Cemetery


5446-90599_37.jpgMoravian Cemetery and church

Moravian Cemetery and church


Bethlehem street

Bethlehem street

And then we headed for home

Looking across the river to the Moravian museum

Looking across the river to the Moravian museum

Posted by greatgrandmaR 00:51 Archived in USA

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Comments

I am a bit confused about your Revolutionary War. I don't really know much about it..
So King forbid making iron furnaces, was his goal to ship those from UK and thus keep industries there? Was those regulations sparks that ignated the war or was it during the war...?

by hennaonthetrek

The Americas had high quality iron ore. In the 1600s, England was getting iron ore from Sweden. England invested large amounts of capital and expertise in America to replace lost Swedish iron, Prior to 1720s only Virginia and Maryland exported pig iron to England. American industry was not allowed to refine raw materials. They were not to compete with manufacturers in England or take jobs from workers in the British Isles. The iron ore was to be smelted in America and shipped to Great Brittan. The Iron Act of 1750 was written to encourage the American manufacture of cast or pig iron and restrict the production of plate, sheet, and nail rods. Britain then shipped goods back to the colonies for the purchase by the colonists.

Hopewell was constructed in defiance of the Iron Act. It wasn't the proximate cause of the war - it was just one of the many things that eventually led to it. Britain wanted the colonies to pay for the expense of the French and Indian War and they tried to get them to do that with taxes.

The revolutionary era is generally considered to have begun with the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765. The military part was 1775 to 1783

by greatgrandmaR

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