A Travellerspoint blog

This blog is published chronologically. Go straight to the most recent post.

Moving up the Coast

Key West to Philadelpia with four cars and a trailer


View Florida in the late 60s & Two Colonial Cities & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

In late 1968, Bob had orders to fly out to the Philippines and board the aircraft carrier Intrepid. The Intrepid was going around the horn, and back to Norfolk which was its home port, but then it was immediately going into the Philadelphia shipyard.

When we arrived in Key West in October 1966, we had three cars (a VW bus and two 1932 Plymouths) and two children ages 5 and 3 (so neither of them was driving yet).

I had a third daughter in May 1968 in Key West.

Bob had bought a house trailer frame, and built a garage on it for one of the antique Plymouths (the one that didn't have a top or a reliable radiator).
Building a garage on a house trailer frame

Building a garage on a house trailer frame

Finished car trailer in the driveway

Finished car trailer in the driveway

Loading the 1932 Plymouth

Loading the 1932 Plymouth


Then he bought a little half ton Chevy pickup to tow the garage trailer with.
Bob working on the hitch

Bob working on the hitch


So In November he took the middle girl B. (age 5 in kindergarten)

Our daughter B - 5 years old

Our daughter B - 5 years old


and drove north with the pick-up hauling the garage trailer.
Trailer hitched to truck

Trailer hitched to truck


He also had with him the Christmas presents including a painting I had done for my Dad of the church he attended as a child.
Original painting which was lost

Original painting which was lost

Other than the difficulty he had with bathrooms in gas stations (sometimes he had to ask a random female to go check on B) they had only one really memoriable incident.

One of the wheels came off of the trailer and rolled off into the woods. They couldn't find it. Fortunately the spare on the pick-up fitted the trailer axle, although when he put the wheel on the shackle had flipped around so the trailer was skewed. When Bob got to Maryland, he dropped the trailer off at his mother's house, and took the truck and B. (and the Christmas presents ) to my mother.

My mother put the presents away. She put the painting away so carefully that we did not find it until we were selling the house after she died in 2007, and I had to paint another one for him.
The second painting

The second painting

Mother loved the pick up and she would driver her contemporaries to meetings - she had a little step stool so they could get into the truck.

Bob flew back to Key West. He and I and the other two children drove the 1932 Plymouth up to Maryland.

5313-000000540020.jpgDaughter D (age 7-second grade) and baby E  in back of Plymouth

Daughter D (age 7-second grade) and baby E in back of Plymouth

When we were on 7 mile bridge, south of Marathon, the Plymouth stopped running.
7 mile bridge from Pigeon Key

7 mile bridge from Pigeon Key


So I got into the driver's seat and steered and Bob pushed. Fortunately we were near the end of the bridge so we coasted down to Pigeon Key, where Bob fixed the Plymouth.
Bob fixing the Plymouth

Bob fixing the Plymouth

The Plymouth stopping made me a little nervous and it was getting late in the year so we were a little afraid of snow or ice, but we made it all the way to my mother's house. We found a garage near my mother's house in Towson where we could store the Plymouth, and we went up to Philadelphia and found a house to rent in the Philadelphia suburb of Folcraft. I also had to buy winter coats for the older girls. I had winter clothes, and the baby E had snowsuits, but the other two had been living in California and Florida since they were under three years old, so they didn't have any coats.
Three kids

Three kids


We had Christmas at my mother's house
E with my mother opening a package

E with my mother opening a package

My dad with E and cousin George

My dad with E and cousin George

Bob left to fly to the Philippines, and the children and I flew back to Key West
Flying back to Key West

Flying back to Key West

My parents also came down too to help me move but they came on the train and bus because my mother didn't like to fly..

B and my dad teaching E to crawl

B and my dad teaching E to crawl

The movers packed me out
E after the movers have left

E after the movers have left

And we all got into the VW bus to try to get to Philadelphia before he did.
My dad with the kids in the VW driving north

My dad with the kids in the VW driving north

I knew from previous moves that there would be less damage to our furniture if it didn't have to go into storage. So we drove as fast as we could (with 3 children) but we didn't even get out of Florida the first night. The second day we stopped in Henderson to see family. Fortunately the mover had to go to Pensacola to pick up another load, and we did make it up there in time.

The house we rented was a 2 story townhouse with a basement. I had made a scale drawing of the rooms and I had little paper scale drawings of the furniture so I knew where everything went. We didn't have to move any furniture after they left. I wanted them up unpack too, but while they would take stuff out of boxes, they woulcn't put it away, so when the kitchen counters got full, they stopped. They hooked up the washer in the basement, but they forgot to attach the drain hose. Fortunately my dad was able to do that for me.

It was January and cold. The first thing I had to do was go to Sears and buy a drier (I had just hung the clothes on clotheslines in Key West) I also had to get an inspection sticker for the VW - it had Pennsylvania plates but had never been in Pennsylvania before.

I don't know exactly when the ship got to the shipyard in Philadephia.
Philadelphia shipyard in 2005

Philadelphia shipyard in 2005

When it did, Bob went and retrieved the car he left in the garage in Towson. He needed it to get to work. He left Chevy pick-up and the trailer with the other Plymouth at his mothers because we had no place to put it.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 04:51 Archived in USA Comments (3)

Getting Acquainted with a Colonial City

Touring Philadelphia in the Winter


View Two Colonial Cities & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

The next thing I had to do after getting an inspection sticker for the car was to find a way to renew my WSI certificate. WSI stands for Water Safety Instructor and it is a Red Cross certification to teach all the swimming courses that the Red Cross offers. Not only does a WSI have to teach as a volunteer on a regular basis, but they have to attend periodic recertifcation classes. Attendence is only for people who have applied for and been given permission to teach in the area. This was a problem for me because I was new in the area and it was the middle of the winter, so there weren't many swimming classes that I could volunteer to teach.

I found that the Philadelphia Shipyard had a pool (heated by blowers in the ceiling blowing hot air on the water, so not very warm) and was giving swimming lessons. Although we were to be volunteers the man that was in charge (who said he was a former Olympic diver) worked through MRW (Morale, Recreation and Welfare) and they charged the kids $2.00 each for a class and they gave all the money to him. The beginning swimming classes would have as many as 40 students. I was to teach Life Saving to a class of older teens, and then the students in that class taught the beginner swimming classes. So the head of the program (whose name I have fortunately forgotten) did not have to do any work at all. All he did was force each of the beginners to jump off the diving board into the deep end at the beginning of each class. He called this "Breaking their fear of the water". Some of the kids loved it, and some did not.

But that gave me a place in the required class, which was in a northern suburb of Philadelphia. I had to find my way there on my own (no GPS in those days). On the way home aftet the class one night, I took the wrong exit off the Schuykill Expressway
Schuykill Expressway in the daytime from the Art Museum

Schuykill Expressway in the daytime from the Art Museum


and found myself in a shady section of south Philly. I had to find a street light with a street sign and park under it so I could figure out on the map where I was and how to get from where I was to home.

Benjamin Franklin Institute

Benjamin Franklin Institute


During the winter, we visited Franklin Institute (I remember we went through the model of the heart).
American Medical School

American Medical School

Birthplace of American Medical unity

Birthplace of American Medical unity


I took photos of the Medical School section for my dad.

We went downtown
City Hall

City Hall

311510353388490-William_Penn..iladelphia.jpgWilliam Penn Statue on a  post card from a child that was not sent

William Penn Statue on a post card from a child that was not sent


We craned our necks looking up at Ben Franklin's statue on the top of the Philadelphia City Hall,
5389-000000260011.jpgCity Hall from the car

City Hall from the car

5391x-90599_11.jpgCiry Hall with new building next to it

Ciry Hall with new building next to it


We visited the Art museum. I don't remember exactly why we went to the museum, except that I might have been interested in the textile exhibit and the Rodin sculptures. There are programs and tours for all ages of school children and Audio Tours. You can even create your own path through the Museum with a variety of random-access audio tours.

I mostly took photos outside. I didn't take photos of the iconic steps from the Rocky movies because that scene was not filmed until 1976.
Main facade of the Art Museum with apartments in back

Main facade of the Art Museum with apartments in back

Museum from the limited parking area-Marshall's statue in front

Museum from the limited parking area-Marshall's statue in front

Seated figure of Chief Justice John Marshall from the back (outside the Art Museum)

Seated figure of Chief Justice John Marshall from the back (outside the Art Museum)


The artist was the son of Joseph Story, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Another outdoor sculputer was

“Social Consciousness,” a trio of dour-looking, allegorical figures 12 feet tall by Jacob Epstein, representing Compassion, Destiny and Death.

“Social Consciousness,” a trio of dour-looking, allegorical figures 12 feet tall by Jacob Epstein, representing Compassion, Destiny and Death.

Mercury Pavillion which has views of the river

Mercury Pavillion which has views of the river

Fairmont Dam From the Art Museum

Fairmont Dam From the Art Museum

The Buildings are the Water Works, an iconic national historic landmark with Greek-Revival buildings. Photo taken From the Art Museum

The Buildings are the Water Works, an iconic national historic landmark with Greek-Revival buildings. Photo taken From the Art Museum

Of course we had to visit the Liberty Bell
Airmail stamp from the 70s - Philadelphia

Airmail stamp from the 70s - Philadelphia


1916 Postcard of Independence Hall

1916 Postcard of Independence Hall


The post card was sent to my grandmother for a penny. On the card is printed: "Independence Hall, fronting on Independence Square, between 5th and 6th Streets, facing Walnut Street. Built in 1729-35 by the Providence of Pennsylvania as the Colonial State House. In the foreground is shown the bronze statue of Commadore Barry."

In 1969, it was pretty simple. We parked and walked in.

Girls, Commadore Barry and Independence Hall in 1969

Girls, Commadore Barry and Independence Hall in 1969


Commadore Barry was an Irishman who is credited as the Father of the American Navy.

Now apparently you need a ticket

Looking up at the tower/cupula

Looking up at the tower/cupula


The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia 1969

The Liberty Bell in Philadelphia 1969


Inscription "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof - Lev. XXV, v. x. By order of the Assembly of the Province of Pensylvania for the State House in Philada."

Almost every American child knows or thinks they know that the Liberty Bell cracked when it was rung to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

But.. The Liberty Bell was NOT rung in 1776 to commemorate the Declaration of Independence and its nickname was coined in 1839 referring to the abolition of slavery.

Facts: A bell for the Pennsylvania State House (which is now called Independence Hall) was cast in London, England and it cracked. Local craftsmen John Pass and John Stow cast a new bell in 1753, using metal from the English bell. (Their names appear on the front of the bell, along with the city and the date.) It hangs from what is believed to be its original yoke which is made of elm wood. By 1846 a thin crack began to affect the sound of the bell. The bell was repaired in 1846 and rang for a George Washington birthday celebration, but the bell cracked again and has not been rung since. No one knows why the bell cracked either time.

In 1970, Procrastinators' Club of America demanded a refund for the Liberty Bell from England's White Chapel Foundry because it had proved to be faulty. White Chapel's response? They graciously offered a full refund - provided that the item could be returned in its original packaging.

Liberty Bell where it used to be with my girls

Liberty Bell where it used to be with my girls


The kids got up close and personal with the Liberty Bell. Which was possible in those days.

Skyline in April 1969

Skyline in April 1969

Posted by greatgrandmaR 03:29 Archived in USA Comments (4)

Easter Vacation in 1969 The First Two Days

Visiting Museums and Towns Around Philadelphia


View Florida in the late 60s & Two Colonial Cities & Transcontinental Drive Across the US in 1966 & Twice across the U.S. in 1964 in a 1932 Plymouth and 1964 Ford & 1964 Ship Follower & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Spring Vacation we went on a 5 day touring spree.

I tried to pick interactive things with buttons to push, demonstrations to see, and things to do.

Day 1

We drove west to Ephrata Chloisters
Children running toward the entrance

Children running toward the entrance


Ephrata was the community of the German Seventh Day Baptist's founded by Conrad Beissel . He believed earthly life should be spent preparing to achieve a spiritual union with God at the Second Coming he felt would be soon.
Bob in front of the Sisters House

Bob in front of the Sisters House


By the early 1750s, nearly 80 celibate Brothers and Sisters were housed in Germanic log, stone, and half-timbered buildings which were originally erected between 1735 and 1749. Although the Cloisters often practiced their religion by interpreting Biblical works, they also did practical things like carpentry and papermaking, plus the daily life jobs of gardening, preparing meals, and sewing. They manufactured clothing on a mill

The Ephrata Cloister had the second German printing press in the American coloniesl They printed hymns on this press.

Cellar door and Sister's house with Dormers in the roof

Cellar door and Sister's house with Dormers in the roof


Saron, the Sisters’ House, was constructed in 1743 for Householder couples who left their homes to live as celibate Brothers and Sisters. It was a brief experiment and when the husbands and wives returned to their farms, the building was remodeled to accommodate the Sisterhood who called themselves the Roses of Sharon. Each of the building’s three main floors contained a kitchen, a room for eating, two common workrooms, and about 12 sleeping chambers, one chamber for each sister. For nearly 15 years Mother Maria Eicher directed the Sisters’ daily duties and maintained their independence from the Brotherhood. After the death of the last Sister in 1813, the building was divided into apartments and rented to church members

postcard of Ephrata

postcard of Ephrata

Next to the Sister's House is The Saal, the Meetinghouse, which is a Fachwerk or half-timbered building constructed in 1741 as a worship hall for Householders. When the Sisterhood moved into the adjoining building, they took control of this Meetinghouse. Here, Sisters worshiped each midnight while the Brothers gathered in their own Saal. The entire congregation used the Meetinghouse on Mount Zion for Saturday worship. The services in each of the Meetinghouses included scripture reading, lessons, and music. Special fellowship gatherings, called Love Feasts, celebrated the coming of Christ with feet washing, a meal, and the Eucharist with bread and wine

Stone building which may be the kitchen

Stone building which may be the kitchen

As the Solitary population shrank in the 1770s, the Householders took a more active part in daily work. They probably added the stone kitchen to the rear of the building as a place to prepare their Love Feast meals.

Bed and window

Bed and window


Members were required to sleep on wooden benches 15 inches wide, with wooden blocks for pillows. They slept six hours per night, from 9 P.M. to midnight, and from 2 A.M. until 5 A.M., with a two-hour break to "watch" for the coming of Christ.

Guide letting us out the door

Guide letting us out the door

Guide ahead of us

Guide ahead of us


The guide is taking us to the Academy which was opened by the Householders in 1837 as a private school for their children and others from the area. The tradition of teaching school at Ephrata dates back to the mid-1700s when Brother Obed (Ludwig Höcker) conducted lessons for neighborhood children. Most of the teaching focused on reading, writing, and arithmetic. At first, the Academy was a subscription school where students paid for each subject they studied to support the teacher’s salary. In the early 1840s, the enterprising teacher, Joseph Wiggins, also offered chemistry, measuring, surveying, and astronomy.
Bob pushing the stroller

Bob pushing the stroller

There are two possibilities to tour Ephrata - you can do a self guided tour on your own, or you can do a tour with a guide which includes a tour of the two most significant original buildings, the Sisters’ House and the Meetinghouse. (The interior of these two buildings are only accessible on guided tours.) We apparently did the guided tour.
Parking lot and Country Store

Parking lot and Country Store

Bob carrying E

Bob carrying E

After we left Ephrata we drove to the Amish/Menonite area of Lancaster.
The sign out front says Antiques

The sign out front says Antiques


We went to the farmer's market in Lancaster but I didn't take any photos of it until much later.
Central Market from the back in 2016

Central Market from the back in 2016


Amish family carriage (closed)

Amish family carriage (closed)


We had lunch and then drove through Bird in Hand and Soudersberg back home.
Gulf gas station and Zimmerman's store

Gulf gas station and Zimmerman's store

Photo of open Amish carriage

Photo of open Amish carriage


I I spent most of the time taking photos of the Amish carriages in stealth mode from the car. The Amish don't believe in photography (graven images)
Wagons in a shed

Wagons in a shed


Amish carriage

Amish carriage

Day 2

The second day we went northwest to Hopewell Furnace in Elverson in the morning. Operating from 1771-1883, Hopewell Furnace was part of the industrialization of the colonies. That was part of the reason that we won the Revolutionary War. The King and Parliment made laws forbidding the construction of iron furnaces, which the colonists did not obey.

But the reason we went was to give the chlidren a day out in history.

5422-.jpgLooking down from the house

Looking down from the house


We saw the
Anthracite furnace

Anthracite furnace


Which was a failed attempt at hot blast technology

large_5426-.jpg

The first part of the Hopewell process was making charcoal, but I don't have any pictures of that. The furnace needed an acre of hardwoods a day. The wood was turned into charcoal. That's why Hopewell had to be out in the country, and it also meant that it was a fairly self contained community. After the charcoal was made and cooled, fillers carted charcoal, limestone, and iron ore via the connecting shed to the

Bridge house

Bridge house

At the base of the furnace the water wheel which drove the blast machinery
Waterwheel

Waterwheel


In the cast house surrounding the furnace stack, moulders cast iron into stove plates and other products.
5421-.jpgBeams inside the Cast House

Beams inside the Cast House


Looking down on the Cast House

Looking down on the Cast House

Hopewell Cast House from inside stable window

Hopewell Cast House from inside stable window

Apporaching the office

Apporaching the office


Office

Office


Tenant houses (right) for families and boarding house (left) for single men

Tenant houses (right) for families and boarding house (left) for single men


Ironmaster's house from below

Ironmaster's house from below


The Ironmaster's house was not only for the furnace owner's family, but it was also the central office for the furnace, and a boarding house for single workers. The house has 19 rooms on four floors. The oldest part of the house dates to circa 1800. Additions built in the 19th century resulted in the house you see today. The basement contains a kitchen and dining room for the use by the furnace's iron workers. The furnace's main office, family parlor, kitchen and dining room were on the first floor. The family and guest bedrooms were on the second. The family's children, servants and boarders likely lived in different parts of the attic and rear wing.
Inside the house

Inside the house

Ironmaster's mansion

Ironmaster's mansion

Map of Hopewell with legend

Map of Hopewell with legend

We continued north to Reading.
1969 Carseat in the VW

1969 Carseat in the VW

We climbed up to the Reading Pagoda
Girls standing between a pagoda shaped phone booth and a sign about Duryea Drive

Girls standing between a pagoda shaped phone booth and a sign about Duryea Drive

The Reading Pagoda was built in 1908. A symbol of the city for more than a Century,
from inside the Pagoda

from inside the Pagoda


the Pagoda is anchored to the mountainside atop the south end of Mount Penn.
5431-90599_00.jpgView from the Pagoda

View from the Pagoda

On the way, to Bethlehem we stopped at Roadside America.
Roadside America

Roadside America


This is a large miniature village representing small-town America. The late Laurence T. Gieringer spent his entire life making the town -- as a small boy, he thought that a building several miles away was really small enough for him to pick up -- a toy rather than a regular building which seemed small because of distance.
Roadside America

Roadside America


Roadside America is laid out in one big 6,000 square foot room, with perimeter walkways. It is actually a whole series of villages showing life from pioneer times to the 60s when Mr. Gieringer died. There are lots of buttons to push to get mechanical things to work, trains to move, or lights to blink. But is very dark in there for photographs

At the end of the day, we went to Bethlehem. On April 2, 1741, William Allen, a wealthy Philadelphia merchant, who later founded the city of Allentown, deeded 500 acres along the banks of the Monocacy Creek and Lehigh River to the Moravian Church. On Christmas Eve of that year David Nitschmann and Nicolaus Zinzendorf, leading a small group of Moravians, founded the mission community of Bethlehem at the confluence of the Monocacy and Lehigh rivers.

They set up missionary communities among the Native Americans and unchurched German-speaking Christians. They named the settlement after the Biblical town Bethlehem of Judea. Bethlehem was started as a typical Moravian Settlement Congregation, where the Church owned all the property. Until the 1850s, officially only members of the Moravian Church were permitted to lease land plots in Bethlehem. But there was also a group of families who were Huguenots and settled in Bethlehem. In the late 1700s,

We drove by the Moravian Cemetery and the church which is now a museum
Moravian Cemetery

Moravian Cemetery


5446-90599_37.jpgMoravian Cemetery and church

Moravian Cemetery and church


Bethlehem street

Bethlehem street

And then we headed for home

Looking across the river to the Moravian museum

Looking across the river to the Moravian museum

Posted by greatgrandmaR 00:51 Archived in USA Comments (2)

Easter Vacation in 1969 - Part 2 - Climbing Day

Wednesday - Valley Forge, Abington and Washington's Crossing


View Two Colonial Cities & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Day 3

This was tower climbing day. Living in Folcroft in a town house, I already had stress on my knees - I had three children including a child in diapers and the only bathroom was on the second floor, and the washer and dryer were in the basement.

We visited Valley Forge. Nowadays Valley Forge is a National Historic Park. At present the Encampment Tour route is a 10-mile driving loop comprised of 9 major tour stops.

After a stop at the visitor's center (which was not there in 1969- it was built in 1978), the next stop is the site of the encampment of troops led by Brigadier General Peter Muhlenberg during the winter of 1777-78.
A reproduction hut at Valley Forge National Historical Park

A reproduction hut at Valley Forge National Historical Park


Today the area consists of reconstructed log soldiers' huts facing a gravel company street. Currently there are nine huts - I only have a photo of one.
Running

Running


The United States National Memorial Arch was erected in the early part of the 20th century to commemorate the arrival and the sacrifices of General George Washington and the Continental Army at Valley Forge during the American Revolution.
National Memorial Arch

National Memorial Arch


In 1969, the next 'step' was to climb the observation tower built on the summet of Mount Joy which was the highest point in Valley Forge STATE Park. It was 75 feet tall and it was 120 steps to the top.
Looking up the fire tower

Looking up the fire tower


The 88 foot structure, built in 1906, gave visitors a panoramic view of the Schuylkill and Great Valleys.

View from the top

View from the top


The tower was condemned and closed by an engineering study in 1979 and the fact that the trees were outgrowing the tower.
View from the top with bare trees

View from the top with bare trees

At the bottom of the fire tower stairs

At the bottom of the fire tower stairs

We visited Artillery Park
Battlefield

Battlefield


and played with the cannons.
5459-98343-001.jpgChildren by cannon at Valley Forge

Children by cannon at Valley Forge

Lifting a cannon ball

Lifting a cannon ball


This was the central location used during the encampment to keep cannons at the ready in case of a British attack.
Washington's Headquarters

Washington's Headquarters


We toured Washington's Headquarters, also known as the Isaac Potts House. This is the structure used by General George Washington and his household during the 1777-1778 encampment of the Continental Army at Valley Forge.
Washington Slept Here

Washington Slept Here

Old postcard of the inside of Washington's Quarter

Old postcard of the inside of Washington's Quarter


We visited Abington Presbyterian Cemetery Abington was named after a town in England. Abington comes up fairly frequently in my family genealogy because my maternal Yerkes grandparents, great grandparents and great greant grandparents are buried there.
PHoto from the Yerkes book

PHoto from the Yerkes book

Abington Church April 1969 with my car parked on the side parking lot

Abington Church April 1969 with my car parked on the side parking lot


My children in '69 On the left are my grandfather and grandmother and between the girls are my great grandfather and great grandmother and some of my great grand uncles

My children in '69 On the left are my grandfather and grandmother and between the girls are my great grandfather and great grandmother and some of my great grand uncles

Yerkes stones just past the tree

Yerkes stones just past the tree


I didn't think there was much else of interest there.

And I was basically right.

But there is a lot of history connected with the church.
Sign on the gate

Sign on the gate


.Founded in 1714, Abington Presbyterian Church is the oldest Presbyterian church in Montgomery Co. and the third oldest in PA. It is the mother church of ten Presbyterian churches in the area. The original small congregation held its services in the home of their pastor Rev. Malachi Jones until 1719 when Mr. Jones sold the church trustees one half acre of his farm "to build a House for the Publick Worship of God And also a place for Burying the Dead." The first church was built in the center of the Burying Ground which is now known as the Abington Cemetery. Nothing remains of this church today.
Two Yerkes stones in Abington Presbyterian Church Cemetery

Two Yerkes stones in Abington Presbyterian Church Cemetery


The first recorded burial was in 1728.
Church with a little of the wall - photo taken in 2011

Church with a little of the wall - photo taken in 2011

The Revolutionary War Battle of Edge Hill was fought in Abington, and it is the first stop on a Historic Route retracing revolutionary battles..The British marched up York Road only to be repulsed by American soldiers entrenched behind the wall of AbingtCemetery.
Abington Presbyterian Church from in the cemetery (photo taken in 2011

Abington Presbyterian Church from in the cemetery (photo taken in 2011


n 1946 when York Road was widened it was necessary to move some of the graves. The records indicated that there were 21 graves in that section. However when they dug them up, 92 bodies were found, including reportedly, those of some Indians.
Historic sign

Historic sign


The cemetery was designated a state historical site by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission and a marker was placed in the cemetery in 1992. No new full interments are accepted in the original cemetery but they have recently opened a Memorial Garden for cremains.

Our last visit was Washington's Crossing.

Not long before our visit, the Washington's Crossing National Historic Park was included in the Washington's Crossing National Historic Landmark designation in 1961, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.

On the night of December 25–26, 1776, General George Washington and a small army of 2,400 men crossed the Delaware River at McConkey's Ferry, on their way to attack a Hessian garrison of 1,500 in Trenton, New Jersey. On the morning of December 26, at the Battle of Trenton, they were able to force the Hessian soldiers to surrender, without any American casualties
Monument

Monument

Steps to the river

Steps to the river


At Washington's Crossing Historic Park, we visited the lower section first. The lower park includes 13 historic buildings
Old Ferry Inn

Old Ferry Inn


including McConkey's Ferry Inn, where General George Washington and his aides ate dinner and made plans prior to the crossing. After we saw the Old Ferry Inn, I also took some photos of the houses in the village.
Historic village houses

Historic village houses


We went to the visitor's center. T
Washington's Statue  from the side of the visitor's center

Washington's Statue from the side of the visitor's center

Statue of Washington at the Visitor Center 1969

Statue of Washington at the Visitor Center 1969


In the visitor's center, we saw a replica of Emanuel Leutze's 1851 painting, of Washington Crossing the Delaware.
Painting at Visitor's Center

Painting at Visitor's Center

The upper section of the park is located 4.5 miles away in Solebury Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Tree lined road

Tree lined road

In its 100-acre area it contains Bowman's Hill Tower
d8641500-03f2-11ed-a50e-e10eff9e907e.JPGThompson-Neely House

Thompson-Neely House


and the Thompson-Neely House, which was used as a military hospital during Washington's encampment in the area

We climbed all the way up 125 foot Bowman's tower that was on top of Bowman’s Hill. Now there is an elevator part way up. On a clear day, you can see 14 miles.
Bowman's Hill Tower

Bowman's Hill Tower

Top of the tower

Top of the tower

View from the top

View from the top

Another view

Another view

A third view

A third view


This wasn't a tower that was here when Washington made his crossing - it was built in 1929-31 to commemorate what may have been a lookout point for Washington’s troops to watch for enemy activity on the Delaware River

Because of all the tower climbing, by the end of this day my knees were so sore I couldn't get my shoes from under the bed. The orthapedist gave me an exercise to do that helped my knees. I was to sit and swing my feet for a half an hour twice a day. He said football players did this with weights on their feet, but he said that I didn't need to do that. So I would put some telephone books on the piano bench (so that my feet didn't touch the ground), and turn on the Tv and adjust the ironing board and swing my feet, watch TV and iron for a half an hour in the morning and in the afternoon.

I have had problems with my knes off and on through the rest of my life. Looking at me now, doctors assume that the problems started after I gained weight, but in 1969, I was as thin as I ever was - I was 5'7.5" and I weighed 140 lbs . MY BMI was 21.5 and that is in the normal range. Although there are no photos of me taken this year, at least not that I can find.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 04:35 Archived in USA Comments (2)

1969 Easter Vacation - part 3

Hershey, Harrisburg, Brandywine and Kennet Square


View Two Colonial Cities & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Day 4

On the fourth day we went west again this time to Hershey. In the early 1700's, Scots-Irish immigrants founded the village of Derry Church in 1729. In the late 1800's Milton Hershey built his chocolate factory in Derry Church. You can smell the chocolate in Hershey and the street lights are in the shape of Hershey Kisses. Every other one is dark brown and the alternate ones are 'wrapped' in sliver paper.
Street scene 1969 - there is one of each kind of street light

Street scene 1969 - there is one of each kind of street light


I took photos of the street lights again years later - you can see these better
IMG_7408.JPGWrapped and unwrapped

Wrapped and unwrapped

In 1969, the town was known for chocolate, an amusement park and the Antique Car Show and swap meet that is held there every October. Bob and I had been to the Swap Meet in 1964 before our trip to California. But this was early spring and not October. We weren't there for the Amusement park either.

In 1969 a tour of the actual chocolate factory was possible. (Now you can only do a virtual tour). At the end of the tour we got some sample chocolate.
Hershey factory in 1969

Hershey factory in 1969

After the tour, we went to the State Capitol in Harrisburg.
State Capitol

State Capitol


The Pennsylvania State Capitol building in Harrisburg was dedicated in October 1906.
Getting out of the VWl

Getting out of the VWl


Approaching Pennsylvania capitoll

Approaching Pennsylvania capitoll


It is crowned by a 272 foot 52 million pound dome modeled after St. Peters in Rome. Inside are paintings, stained glass and antique furnishings.
B and D on steps inside

B and D on steps inside

Statue in the capitol

Statue in the capitol

Inside of the dome

Inside of the dome

Painting- Science

Painting- Science


Old Postcard-Senate Charmber in the State Capitol

Old Postcard-Senate Charmber in the State Capitol


Capitol building from the side

Capitol building from the side


Liberty bell replica

Liberty bell replica

5493-000000260030.jpgState Museum and Archive Tower

State Museum and Archive Tower

Part of the state capitol complex

Part of the state capitol complex

Harrisburg Moose Lodge

Harrisburg Moose Lodge

Building near Harrisburg

Building near Harrisburg

Harrisburg bridges

Harrisburg bridges

Day 5

The last day of the vacation, we went south to Brandywine Battlefield. The Brandywine Battlefield is actually in Chadd's Ford, Pennsylvania, and not in Brandywine Delaware. The confusion comes about because the Brandywine River Valley includes the hills of southern Chester County, PA (and in addition to Chadd's Ford this includes Kennett Square and Longwood Gardens), where the Battle of Brandywine was fought, and on the other side of the river is northern New Castle County, DE including Wilmington, DE
Brandywine gun and entrance to one of the buildings

Brandywine gun and entrance to one of the buildings


It was here in the first battle of the Revolutionary War that the British deceived Washington which resulted in the loss of Philadelphia.

Old postcard  General Washington's Headquarters

Old postcard General Washington's Headquarters

Washington's Headquarters at Benjamin Ring House

Washington's Headquarters at Benjamin Ring House

Gideon Gilpin House - 19 year old Marquise stayed

Gideon Gilpin House - 19 year old Marquise stayed

The Rest of the Story

Washington picked the high ground at Chadd's Ford as a good place to defend Philadelphia because he expected that the British (who had unloaded their soldiers and armament at the head of the Elk River - the present day site of Elkton) would have to cross (ford) the river here. On September 9th, 1777, he posted forces at all the fords he knew along the Brandywine to prevent the British from crossing. General Howe, put some troops opposite Kennett Square to act as a distractor, but actually on September 11th, the main body of the troups crossed several miles north of Wistar's Ford at a ford unknown to Washington]Battlefield gun and cemetery (1969)

Battlefield gun and cemetery (1969)

Although the Continental Army fought bravely, Howe's manuever resulted in the eventual fall of Philadelphia. Congress abandoned Philadelphia and moved first to Lancaster and then to York to escape before the British takeover. Important military supplies were moved out of the Philadelphia area to Reading, Pennsylvania, where they could be defended.
Old postcard - Brandywine Battlefield State Park

Old postcard - Brandywine Battlefield State Park


The actual park (which is closed on Monday) has a museum which has a permanent interpretive exhibit and an audio-visual presentation graphically tell the story of the battle and its relation to the Philadelphia Campaign of 1777, and tours of Washington's headquarters and Lafayettes' headquarters.

But that's not all. There are three driving tours that can be taken to battle sites. They are the

  • Straight Ahead Tour across today's Route 1 where the British made lots of noise and created lots of smoke -- all to deceive Washington (2 hours)
  • The Cornwallis Tour which traces the route that the British Army took (2 hours) and
  • The Battle Driving Tour which leads you through the actual battle sequence (1 hour)

Then went to Kennett Square and toured Longwood Gardens greenhouses.
Old postcard

Old postcard


Longwood Gardens was originally owned by a Quaker, George Peirce. His great grandsons started an arboretum which covered 15 acres. The arboretum was neglected, but when a lumber mill operator was contracted to remove the trees Pierre du Pont purchased the farm. He developed the gardens

Children and Bob in the greenhouse 1969

Children and Bob in the greenhouse 1969


Children with tour guide

Children with tour guide

2367419-Azaleas_Philadelphia.jpgSpring Indoors

Spring Indoors


5506-x98336_09.jpgOne of my children with the roses

One of my children with the roses


5513-000000060011.jpgGreen Lawn in the Green House

Green Lawn in the Green House

Stroller in the greenhouse

Stroller in the greenhouse

Red Flowers

Red Flowers

5516-000000060013.jpgChildren in the VW

Children in the VW

Posted by greatgrandmaR 19:39 Archived in USA Comments (2)

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